A FIVE YEAR CHILD CARE PLAN

FOR YUBA AND SUTTER COUNTIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan Prepared for the

Child Care Planning Council of Yuba and Sutter Counties

 

November 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Willa Bowman Pettygrove, Consultant

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

            I.      Executive Summary

 

         II.      Child Care Planning Council Mission Statement and Goals

 

     III.      Plan Process

 

      IV.      Priorities

 

         V.      Time Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.  Needs Assessment Objectives and Recommendations

 

2.  Summary of Strategic Collaboration Workshop

 

3.  Comparison of Needs Assessment Outcomes and Prop. 10 Priorities

 

4.  Membership of the Child Care Planning Council

 

5.  Summary of Statutory Requirements for Child Care Planning Councils

 

 

 

 

 

 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

                This plan is the result of three distinct but related processes undertaken by the Child Care Planning Council of Yuba and Sutter.  It identifies actions that are likely to achieve the greatest progress toward the Council’s mission and goals.  It also identifies ways in which the Council can bring its own resources and others to bear on the greatest unmet needs in early care and education[1] in the two counties.

 

            The plan culminates a yearlong effort that included an update of a needs assessment (including parent focus groups), a collaborative planning workshop with diverse agencies, and deliberation by the Council to develop a list of priorities.  The report’s attachments summarize the components of the planning process and provide other supportive information.  The body of the report focuses on the principal conclusions of the process, which are the priorities for action for the next five years.  The following priorities are grouped into three content areas:  quality or “best practices”, resources, and planning.  The concluding section of the report orders the priorities in a five year time line.

 

WORK TO PROMOTE BEST PRACTICES IN ALL FORMS OF EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION.

 

Current:

·         Continue efforts to recognize and support quality in all forms of early care and education.

·         Continue education to parents and public agencies about the importance of quality in early care and education.

 

High Priority:

·         Support training resources for all forms of child care to assure quality in programs and services.

·         Support training and resource development to serve families of children with behavioral and emotional challenges.

 

Medium Priority:

·         Develop information on “what works” in child care for children with disabilities, based on experiences of parents and providers.  Develop provider training resources from this information.

·         Collaborate with health agencies and health providers to incorporate preventive health practices into child care.

·         Involve child care providers in planning training, to increase participation in and benefit from training resources.

 


SEEK FUNDING AND OTHER RESOURCES IN ORDER TO MEET SERVICE NEEDS AND IMPROVE AFFORDABILITY.

 

Current:

·         Advocate and support funding applications to provide adequate subsidies for all income-eligible families, from all potential funding sources.

·         Conduct an analysis of economic benefits of child care as a tool for working with chambers of commerce, economic development staff in local government, and the private sector.

 

High Priority:

·         Work directly with employers to develop policies and services such as child care assistance and “family friendly” policies and benefits. 

·         Collaborate with diverse community agencies to identify child care sites.

·         Collaborate with Children and Families First Commissions to develop and fund the CARES program for child care staff recruitment, training, and retention.

·         Investigate Community Development Block Grant funding from local jurisdictions as a resource for child care development.

 

Medium Priority:

·         Collaborate with Children and Families First Commissions to develop and support services for family child care providers and for license exempt providers.

·         Assist with planning efforts in the community to identify funding sources for school age child care.

 

CONTINUE TO SERVE AS A SOURCE OF CHILD CARE PLANNING INFORMATION FOR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT, ASSESSMENT, AND ADVOCACY FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES.

 

Current:

·         Maintain public visibility of the Planning Council as a resource for families and children and the agencies that serve them.

·         Continue to review CalWORKs policy and implementation.

·         Continue to serve as a source of planning data for child care service development.

 

High Priority:

·         Work directly with community groups and “stakeholders” (schools, public agencies,  nonprofit organizations, etc.) to plan child care services that address specific needs in terms of age of child, location, and ethnic/cultural diversity. 

 

Medium Priority:

·         Encourage collaboration among agencies serving older school age youth and young adolescents.

·         Collaborate with transit providers to improve access to child care services.

·         Assess need and identify barriers to young parents’ use of child care to support their education, employment and family well being.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISSION STATEMENT

 

The Child Care Planning Council of Yuba and Sutter Counties is actively committed to the promotion and support of quality child care services in our communities.

 

GOALS

 

·        To promote and enhance the quality and safety of child care and development services through planning, public education, provider education, and provision of support services.

 

 

·        To increase the supply and accessibility of quality child care and development services through a collaborative interagency approach.

 

 

·        To develop and implement strategies to identify the changing child care needs of our community.

 

 

·        To identify and understand all resources available to meet local child care needs.

 

 

Approved November 28, 2000


THE PLAN PROCESS

 

                In 1998, the Child Care Planning Council of Yuba and Sutter County (“Council”) began to update its child care needs assessment and to develop plans to address unmet child care needs in the two Counties. (Attachments Four and Five describe the Council and its history and legislative mandates.) This effort was in part a response to new legislative mandates that came with the implementation of welfare reform or CalWORKs.  However, the Planning Council had begun its work several years before this legislation was enacted, and its mission encompassed families at all income levels. The Council completed three distinct but related phases to produce its plan2. 

 

Needs Assessment Update: The Council completed an update of its needs assessment in 1999. The needs assessment process included analysis of Census and other existing data, interviews of agency representatives, and focus groups for parents of specific linguistic and geographic minorities.  The Needs Assessment Report covered the supply and demand of child care services in different jurisdictions in the two county region, specific issues about child care cost, and a variety of other issues that affect families’ access to needed services of good quality. Attachment One summarizes the principal recommendations from the Needs Assessment Report and the recommended actions related to these.

 

The framework outlined in Attachment One served as the basis for the next two steps in planning for action over the next five years.

 

Strategic Collaboration Workshop: The Council decided to complete a process of “Strategic Collaboration” as the next step for its plan. This is an inclusive and strategic approach to planning that includes other “stakeholders” who also have mandates, plans, and resources committed to children and families.  The Planning Council already has a strong collaborative relationship, common missions, and shared effort with Children’s Home Society of California’s (CHS) Resource and Referral program, and with CalWORKs staff in both Counties.  The Planning Council also has a direct link with the Yuba and Sutter County Offices of Education through the statutory requirement that these agencies appoint members and approve specific actions of the Council.  With the implementation of Proposition 10, the Children and Families First Commissions (“Prop. 10”) offer significant new resources and have developed their own plans. A diverse set of programs, administered by local school districts, the County Health Departments, and community organizations, also provide services and have interests in the direction and actions of the Planning Council.

 

In June 2000 the Council hosted a day long session to which stakeholders were invited.  (Attachment Two gives conclusions from that meeting, with a list of participants and facilitators.)  After identifying areas for collaboration, the workshop participants went on to develop more specific action plans.  These plans clearly defined the Council’s role in initiating dialogues among decision makers, pulling together stakeholders for service development, and making the vision statement the first step of its plan.  By implication, the Council should lead by encouraging collaboration and developing a focused plan. Other agencies would follow by developing and coordinating services with direction from the plan.

 

            As a follow up to the session, the planning consultant analyzed the Council’s Needs Assessment relative to the newly completed strategic plans for the Prop. 10 Commissions of Yuba and Sutter Counties.  This analysis is represented by Attachment Three.

            Priority Setting: In August 2000, Council gathered together the strands of the planning process and prepared to set priorities for its own activities.  They added items from the Strategic Collaboration Workshop, and from interaction with the Prop. 10 Commissions, to the original list from the Needs Assessment.  The following recommendations are ordered by content and priority.  Each section cites relevant findings and recommendations from the Needs Assessment.

 

PRIORITIES

 

WORK TO PROMOTE BEST PRACTICES IN ALL FORMS OF EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION.

 

Current:

·         Continue efforts to recognize and support quality in all forms of early care and education.

·         Continue education to parents and public agencies about the importance of quality in early care and education.

 

The Council has supported a number of activities to recognize quality and educate parents and the public about child care.   These have included participating in and providing brochures and other materials for public events, health clinics, and area pediatricians.  In addition the Council initiated a job shadowing activity for public officials and agency staff to work in local child care programs.  One of the Council’s most creative activities has been the “Prize Patrol” in which a child care program is recognized each month with a visit, donated gifts, and publicity.  The Council has also disseminated information on quality to interested programs, including material on national accreditation for centers and family child care homes.

 

High Priority:

·         Support training resources for all forms of child care to assure quality in programs and services.

 

There continue to be concerns about the high use rate for license exempt child care among CalWORKs families.  Council staff have participated in planning sessions for a regional project to train and license exempt providers. 

 

In March 1999 the Council reported to Child Development Division/California Department of Education (CDD/CDE) “our area has had difficulty recruiting qualified staff both in private sector and public sector programs…this has affected the quality of care provided in some of our programs.”  The Council has met with administrators from Yuba College to determine whether there are ways to increase resources for training.  The Council is currently completing a salary survey that may suggest strategies to improve recruitment and retention of qualified staff.

 

·         Support training and resource development to serve families of children with behavioral and emotional challenges.

 

The Needs Assessment findings did not provide clear support for more child care for children with disabilities.  Children with severe orthopedic and developmental disabilities are eligible for early intervention special education services.  These offer developmental group experiences and provide parents with respite. 

 

Children with emotional and behavioral challenges, whose disabilities may not be as severe or even clearly diagnosed, are difficult to serve in group settings.  Their parents face barriers to finding appropriate child care.

 

Medium Priority:

·         Develop information on “what works” in child care for children with disabilities, based on experiences of parents and providers.  Develop provider training resources from this information.

 

The Needs Assessment did not present a clear picture about the need for services for children with disabilities.  A survey that began with the experiences of families and providers could do much to clarify and build models for good practice.  Contact points to reach experienced parents and providers would be the families participating in the Sutter County Parent Network, Yuba County Family Resource Center, and the County schools special education programs, and CHS’s Resource and Referral program.

 

·         Collaborate with health agencies and health providers to incorporate preventive health practices into child care.

 

While agreeing that childhood illness is a burden for parents who must go to work, the Council has not identified a single approach to meet these needs.  Should services be provided to care for children so parents can work, or should parents be given flexibility (through sick leave, for example) to stay home with a sick child? The Needs Assessment noted: “Prevention may also prove to be a good, if incomplete, solution.  Collaboration between public health and child care providers could actually reduce the incidence of some illnesses.  This strategy has been used in many areas with provider education that extends to simple practices such as hand washing (by providers, children and parents), diapering, and safe food handling.”

 

Parents also need preventive health information, so that they may be partners in reducing the incidence of illness in their families and among children in care.  Another educational strategy is to help parents identify “back up” child care arrangements before they are needed.

 

·         Involve child care providers in planning training, to increase participation in and benefit from training resources.

 

Council members noted that in spite of repeated efforts to offer training, especially to home-based providers, response has not met expectations.  A survey should identify specific training needs and barriers to participation as perceived by the potential participants.

 

SEEK FUNDING AND OTHER RESOURCES IN ORDER TO MEET SERVICE NEEDS AND IMPROVE AFFORDABILITY.

 

Current:

·         Advocate for and support funding applications to provide adequate subsidies for all income-eligible families, from all potential funding sources.

 

The Needs Assessment cited data provided by CDD/CDE estimating that there are approximately 5,000 children in the two counties who would be eligible for subsidized care.  This does not suggest, of course, that all families who would be eligible would use it.  But it does indicate the scale of the unmet need.  Subsidies have increased significantly with the implementation of CalWORKs.  However, these subsidies have gone to families who are new consumers of child care.  The CalWORKs child care subsidies have done little to offset the needs of lower income workers who were not welfare recipients.

 

·         Conduct an analysis of economic benefits of child care as a tool for working with chambers of commerce, economic development staff in local government, and the private sector.

 

The Council has begun a strategy that has been undertaken in other California Counties to demonstrate the economic benefits of child care. This strategy, called “Local Investment in Child Care”, will be a tool to make the case to policy makers and the private sector for more local support of child care.  Child care is an employment generator, consumer of local services, and major enterprise in its own right.  These benefits are in addition to its primary functions of supporting the development of children and permitting their parents to go to work.

 

High Priority:

·         Work directly with employers to develop policies and services such as child care assistance and “family friendly” policies and benefits. 

 

Employers in other communities have achieved recognition for development of child care centers and employee benefits.  However, employers have other, cost effective options to help employees balance work/family responsibilities and increase their commitment to work.  For example, employers might begin by increasing their awareness of the impact of child care on parents’ performance and by developing policies such as sick leave and personal leave that permit families to care for their own children when ill.

 

·         Collaborate with diverse community agencies to identify child care sites.

 

·         Collaborate with Children and Families First Commissions to develop and fund the CARES program for child care staff recruitment, training, and retention.

 

·         Investigate Community Development Block Grant funding from local jurisdictions as a resource for child care development.

 

Medium Priority:

·         Collaborate with Children and Families First Commissions to develop and support services for family child care providers and for license exempt providers.

 

This is a shared concern among the two Commissions and the Planning Council.  The Council is now participating in a regional effort to obtain foundation funds to develop a regional training project that would share resources (for example, training materials prepared in providers’ primary languages) and strategies for training.

 

·         Assist with planning efforts in the community to identify funding sources for school age child care.

 

These planning efforts could include funding for facility development and for operating subsidies.  However, past opportunities for funding were missed because potential sites were not available.  A collaborative planning effort should create an inventory of potential sites on or near school sites.  The Needs Assessment noted, “. The Council can work closely with potential child care providers to identify resources (including State expansion funds) and to ‘fine tune’ program proposals by going back to potential consumers.  Local surveys or focus groups can help interested agencies assess consumer preferences for center versus family child care, and ability of families to pay for services.”

 

 

CONTINUE TO SERVE AS A SOURCE OF CHILD CARE PLANNING INFORMATION FOR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT, ASSESSMENT, AND ADVOCACY FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES.

 

Current:

·         Maintain public visibility of the Planning Council as a resource for families and children and the agencies that serve them.

 

·         Continue to serve as a source of planning data for child care service development.

 

Legislation passed in the 2000 session has extended the list of legislative mandates for Child Care Planning Councils.  With good local visibility the Yuba/Sutter Council may be called on to advise on the feasibility of local programs, to assist with proposal writing, and to collect more information about child care need.

 

The Council can promote collaboration among agencies to implement best practices in accommodating children with disabilities (see comments above). 

 

·         Continue to review CalWORKs policy and implementation.

 

This is a legislative mandate.  The CalWORKs staff of the two Counties has been well represented on the Council.  Changes in local CalWORKs policy, and in the demographics of CalWORKs participants, could result in changes in needed services and ability of families to pay for them.  Local agencies have expressed concerns about the ability of non-CalWORKs lower income families to have access to subsidized care.

 

High Priority:

·         Work directly with community groups and “stakeholders” (schools, public agencies, nonprofit organizations, etc.) to plan child care services that address specific needs in terms of age of child, location, and ethnic/cultural diversity. 

 

The Needs Assessment drew from and referred to needs assessments and other planning efforts by many agencies in the two Counties: Maternal and Child Health, E-Center Head Start and Migrant Head Start, community collaboratives funded by Sierra Health Foundation and other sources; and a Healthy Start Evaluation by Marysville Joint Unified School District.

 

The Needs Assessment went directly to some community groups to learn more about specific needs. It documented the diversity in terms of rural and small city contexts, different ethnic and language groups, and family preferences and needs.  Further collaboration through planning would result in more accurate understanding of what community groups need and how to respond.

 

Specific needs, such as migrant child care, part day care for at-risk families, and care during nontraditional work schedules, are all discussed in the Needs Assessment.

 

Medium Priority:

·         Encourage collaboration among agencies serving older school age youth and young adolescents.

 

Young people in these age groups face real risks and challenges in terms of social development, education, career preparation, and crime and violence.  Among the barriers to parents: finding and paying for activities, language and culture, and transportation. “Although not specifically ‘child care’, the need for after-school and vacation activities that are safe, age-appropriate, and easily accessible were mentioned time and again…many people were unaware of those activities that are available.  Of special concern are those for pre-teens and teens.” (Sutter County MCH Community Needs Assessment, p. 65)

 

·         Collaborate with transit providers to improve access to child care services.

 

One solution is to locate more services where families live.  The other is to develop transportation options to improve access to services in the Cities.  Yuba Sutter Transit has been successful in obtaining funds to develop services specifically for lower income persons, including those eligible for CalWORKs.  The challenge for transit operators is finding sufficient ridership in remote areas to justify the addition of transit services.  Another alternative may be funding for agencies to develop their own transportation services.

 

·         Assess need and identify barriers to young parents’ use of child care to support their education, employment and family well being.

 

The Needs Assessment documented the consensus that teen pregnancy is a concern in the community.  However, the Council has observed the paradox that while a service has been needed, existing programs lack adequate enrollment. The Council recently sponsored a multi-agency Roundtable to raise awareness of this issue, recruit new enrollment for one program, and seek collaborative solutions to the problem. 

 

LEGISLATIVE MANDATES AND OTHER WORK BEYOND THE PLAN

 

In addition to the priorities identified through the three phases of the plan process, the Council continues to respond to external mandates and requests for action.  Many of these can be included within the activities identified as priorities in one of the areas outlined above.  However, a few need more specific attention and will place significant demands on time and resources in the next five years. The following were identified in the original mandates from AB 1542 of 1997 (Attachment Five).  In addition, the mandates created by recent legislation (AB 212 of 2000) are described at the end of this section.

 

Update five year needs assessment: This task was completed in 1999, so the Council can expect to face it again in less than five years.  Results of the 2000 Census will be available and should make the completion of the next update much easier.  The 1999 update was designed to permit easy substitution of new numbers as they become available, from diverse sources.

 

Public input for priority setting: The Council may expect this as a routine activity in every planning process.  It will also be a specific requirement contingent on the availability of program expansion funds from CDD/CDE.  The Council has concluded public hearings in anticipation of CDD funding in winter, 2000.

 

Review of CDD/CDE and DSS programs relative to priorities: In a general sense, this is an ongoing activity of the Council.  To date the Council has not received specific guidelines for reviewing State programs.

 

Centralized eligibility lists: Centralized eligibility lists (CEL) have been proposed as a way to improve family access to multiple publicly funded programs and streamline recruitment and enrollment.    CEL would also benefit planning by permitting the list of eligible but unserved families to be used as an unduplicated count of unmet need. 

 

A Committee of the Council has met four times to identify issues related to CEL, and Committee members participated in a regional meeting for training and to help identify universal data elements for the CEL.  The Committee identified the following issues:

1.       Accessibility to families including the barriers of literacy, language and technology.

2.       Issues around duplication of families and children on the CEL

3.       Costs associated with the maintenance of a CEL including a central location and ability to keep the list current (staffing).

4.       Statewide acknowledgement of designating the list’s purpose as a basis for funding or data collection.

5.       Accessibility to all providers and contractors within Yuba and Sutter Counties.

6.       Meeting the needs of all families eligible for subsidy while maintaining confidentiality.

 

Coordinate part-day programs including Head Start and State Preschool to provide full-day child care: The Council’s Needs Assessment identified some distinct groups for whom part day programs continue to serve a need.  Many part day programs share space; so more coordination would not increase capacity.  Head Start has developed some services for families needing full day care. 

 

To date models for coordination of part day services for full day care have not been feasible.  However, the Centralized Eligibility List may prove to be a good planning tool to identify where there is unmet need for full day services by income eligible families.

 

            Develop and implement a training plan for more efficient and productive LPC meetings: Neither the Coordinator nor Consultants to the Council have identified needs for additional training.  Council members have benefited from some professional development opportunities such as the annual conference sponsored by the Child Development Programs Advisory Committee (CDPAC).

 

Assembly Bill 212 of 2000: The successful passage of this legislation, which creates a variety of strategies to reduce turnover of child care staff in State funded programs, creates new mandates for the Council.  The bill is modeled on the Compensation and Retention Encourage Stability (CARES) program and is targeted only to staff in publicly subsidized programs.  Funding for employee retention will be allocated to Local Planning Councils based on the percentage of State subsidized center-based child development funding received by the County.  It appears that this bill is the first instance in which Councils will directly distribute funds, not simply set priorities or react to funding decisions made by CDD/CDE.

 

The Council has initiated its own activities to address the problem of high staff turnover in private child care centers.  This was identified as an issue in the Council’s Needs Assessment.  The Council has organized a group for directors of private centers, which meets regularly.   The Council is completing a salary survey, which will help directors evaluate their pay scales and other staffing policies in order to improve retention and performance of staff.

 

TIME LINE FOR ACTIVITIES

 

As a final step, the Council ordered the activities on a five-year time line, recognizing that some activities may be quickly accomplished while other will be achieved in small increments.  The time line follows on the next page.


ACTIVITIES TIMELINE

 

NOW

Educate parents and public agencies about the importance of quality in early care and education.

 

Be a resource for families and children and the agencies that serve them.

 

Advocate and support funding applications to provide adequate subsidies for all income-eligible families, from all potential funding sources.

 

Review CalWORKs policy and implementation.

Continue efforts to recognize and support quality in all forms of early care and education.

 

Analyze economic benefits of child care as a tool to use with chambers of commerce, economic development staff in local government, and the private sector.

 

Provide planning data for child care service development.

2001

 

 

 

Assess need and identify barriers to young parents’ use of child care to support their education, employment and family well being.

 

Implement program AB 212 of 2000.

 

Involve child care providers in planning training, to increase participation in and benefit from training resources.

Investigate Community Development Block Grant funding from local jurisdictions as a resource for child care development.

2002

 

Support training and resource development to serve families of children with behavioral and emotional challenges.

 

Develop provider training on “what works” in child care for special needs children, based on parent and provider experiences. 

Collaborate with Prop. 10 Commissions to develop and fund the CARES program.

 

Support training resources for quality in all forms of child care.

 

Collaborate with Prop. 10 Commissions to develop and support services for family child care license exempt providers.

Collaborate with transit providers to improve access to child care services.

 

2003

Assist with planning efforts in the community to identify funding sources for school age child care.

 

Encourage collaboration among agencies serving older school age youth and young adolescents.

 

Collaborate with Children’s Home Society and subsidized child care providers to develop Centralized Eligibility List (CEL).

 

Support collaboration among part day subsidized child care centers to develop extended day services and to maximize use of sites.

Collaborate with health agencies and health providers to incorporate preventive health practices into child care.

 

 

2004

Work directly with community groups and “stakeholders” (schools, public agencies, nonprofit organizations, etc.) to plan child care services that address specific needs in terms of age of child, location, and ethnic/cultural diversity. 

 

 

 

Work directly with employers to develop policies and services such as child care assistance and “family friendly” policies and benefits. 

 

Collaborate with diverse community agencies to identify child care sites.


CURRENT AND ONGOING ACTIVITIES

 

·         Continue efforts to recognize and support quality in all forms of early care and education.

·         Continue education to parents and public agencies about the importance of quality in early care and education.

·         Advocate and support funding applications to provide adequate subsidies for all income-eligible families, from all potential funding sources.

·         Conduct an analysis of economic benefits of child care as a tool for working with chambers of commerce, economic development staff in local government, and the private sector.

·         Maintain public visibility of the Planning Council as a resource for families and children and the agencies that serve them.

·         Continue to review CalWORKs policy and implementation.

·         Continue to serve as a source of planning data for child care service development.

 

2001

 

·         Investigate Community Development Block Grant funding from local jurisdictions as a resource for child care development.

·         Implement program for staff retention in State funded child development programs according to the requirements of AB 212 of 2000.

·         Assess need and identify barriers to young parents’ use of child care to support their education, employment and family well being.

·         Involve child care providers in planning training, to increase participation in and benefit from training resources.

 

2002

 

·         Support training and resource development to serve families of children with behavioral and emotional challenges.

·         Develop information on what works in child care for children with disabilities, based on experiences of parents and providers.  Develop provider-training resources from this information.

·         Collaborate with Children and Families First Commissions to develop and fund the CARES program for child care staff recruitment, training, and retention.

·         Collaborate with transit providers to improve access to child care services.

·         Support training resources for all forms of child care to assure quality in programs and services.

·         Collaborate with Children and Families First Commissions to develop and support services for family child care providers and for license exempt providers.

 

2003

 

·         Collaborate with health agencies and health providers to incorporate preventive health practices into child care.

·        Assist with planning efforts in the community to identify funding sources for school age child care

·        Encourage collaboration among agencies serving older school age youth and young adolescents


2004

 

·         Work directly with employers to develop policies and services such as child care assistance and “family friendly” policies and benefits. 

·         Collaborate with diverse community agencies to identify child care sites.

·         Work directly with community groups and “stakeholders” (schools, public agencies, non-profit organizations, etc.) to plan child care services that address specific needs in terms of age of child, location, and ethnic/cultural diversity. 

 

2005

 

·         Complete needs assessment and begin next five year plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT ONE

 

Needs Assessment Objectives and Recommendations

LPC Outcomes (From Needs Assessment)

Strategies, Actions for the Council (For Discussion)

Adequate subsidized care for all income eligible families, regardless of CalWORKs status

Continue to plan, prioritize, and advocate to all potential funding sources.

Child care related to specific needs: 

·         Language /ethnicity,

·         Migrant/seasonal,

·         Nontraditional schedules

Work directly with specific community groups (including faith community where appropriate).

Work with employers of lower income workers to develop family support strategies and plan child care services.

Increased center based care for infants/toddlers

Assist with local planning efforts at the community level to determine desired form of care, and to identify potential funding sources.

Encourage collaboration among the Planning Council, Prop. 10 Commissions, school districts, and community based organizations (including housing providers) to identify child care sites.

Seek funding for mixed used community centers in remote rural areas.  Support collaborative planning among local entities.

Increased services for school age children

More, better quality child care services that accommodate children with disabilities

Interview parents of children with disabilities to identify successful models of child care.

Survey providers regarding specific support services that have assisted them in making accommodations.

Use findings from these to educate other providers.

Child care during childhood illness.

Collaborate with public health programs and health providers to incorporate preventive health practices into child care.

Increase parent education about the role of child care in illness prevention.

Research alternatives for “get well” child care.

Coordinated, affordable options for older school age youth/young adolescents.

Find subsidy sources for youth recreation programs.

Increase collaboration between public recreation programs, schools, and volunteer clubs.

Include recreation programs in planning and development of transit services.

Increased access and better information about subsidized services to all locations and populations.

Assist in development of Centralized Eligibility List (CEL).

Increase public visibility of Planning Council

Resolve problems of transportation, location to improve family access to services

Research funding for mixed used community centers in remote rural areas.  Support collaborative planning among local entities.

Improve services for family support, intervention, and respite (including and teen parents CPS referrals)

Support part day early care and education programs to meet family support and parent education needs.

Assess need for young parent programs and models that will meet local needs.

Identify barriers to young parents’ education and employment, and use of child care.

Increased access to parenting information, education, and support.

Increased stability and qualifications of child care staff and providers (family child care and license exempt)

Collaborate with Yuba and Sutter County Prop. 10 Commission to seek funding and develop CARES program.

Participate in regional projects and collaborate with Yuba County Prop. 10 Commission on training for license exempt providers.

Collaborate with CHS to expand services for family child care providers.

 

 

 

 


ATTACHMENT TWO

Summary of Strategic Collaboration Workshop

 

Attendees

Invited Participants

Joanne Aiello, E Center Yuba Sutter Head Start

Gaileen Bumgarner, Children’s Home Society of California

Tresia Filby, Bi-County Day Care Association

Ed Fischer, Sutter County Children and Families Commission.

Ann Kress, Yuba College ECE Coordinator

Barbara Miles, Yuba County Human Resources Department

Pat Poldevart, Yuba County Career Training and Education Center

Sally Sokoloski, Yuba County Office of Education

Jackie Stanfill, Sutter-Yuba Mental Health

Donna Van Meter, Sutter County Employment Services Cal Works

Kathy Woods, Marysville Joint Unified Child Development Programs

 

Coordinator

Jorgine Allan Rogers

 

Workshop Facilitators

Richard Casias and Carolyn Penny, Accord Associates

 

Planning Consultant

Willa Bowman Pettygrove

 

Topics and Actions for Collaboration

 

Education in Child Care Issues

·         Educate decision makers on importance of child care and the impact it can have on families

·         LPC and Prop. 10 highlight child care quality as a child health strategy

·         Education of all parties involved in the process

·         Educate consumers and providers about child care

 

Shared Advocacy Efforts and Dialog among Agencies

·         Identify/designate point people within each organization

·         Collaborate among child care agencies to be one voice for children and families—local and state level

·         Clarify roles of stakeholders and how to implement new policies

 

Vision

·         Build a vision of what collaborative, coordinated child care looks like

·         Focus all parties on the common goal

 

        VI.      Training/Support for Providers

·         LPC/CHS use family child care association as mentor/trainer pool for new providers

·         Coordinate training opportunities for child care

·         Improve support systems for child care providers (licensed and exempt)

·         Advocate for more and better early care and education training resources at Yuba College

15

Filling the Gaps/Coordination of Services

·         Improve the quality and access/supply of child care to all families in the community

·         Expand day care services to meet unique needs:  sick care, special needs

·         COE apply for facility funds to put portables at school sites.

·         Coordinate services for families (many families are served by multiple agencies; work together)

·         Create child care services systems to meet needs of low income families

·         Streamline the systems so that families have access to the child care services they need

·         Use resources in the way they were meant to be used

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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ATTACHMENT THREE                                                                                              

Comparison of Needs Assessment Outcomes and Proposition 10 Priorities for Sutter and Yuba Counties

LPC Outcomes

Sutter County Proposition 10 Plan

Yuba County Proposition 10 Plan

Adequate subsidized care for all income- eligible families, regardless of CalWORKs status

“Coordinate implementation of child evaluation process with existing resources to provide care and services”

“Lack of adequate, accessible child care”

“Increase the accessibility and number of quality early childhood care and development programs/ providers”

 

“Increasing the quantity and quality of care for children of working parents”

“Increase the number of childcare slots. Increase local capacity to support the development of licensed childcare facilities where needed.’

YCCFC Resource Coordinator to “identify existing assets and new funding” for child care facilities

Child care related to specific needs: 

Language /ethnic diversity

Migrant/seasonal work patterns

Nontraditional schedules

Increased center based care for infants/toddlers , school age children

More, better quality child care services that accommodate children with disabilities

“Expand resources and supports for parents of children with special needs.”

“Services for special needs children”

“Prenatal and preconceptual care”

“Support children with disability in a childcare setting, YCCFC Resource Coordinator to work with school and other programs”

Child care during childhood illness.

 

“Effort linking the health care systems that exist to provide ill childcare services…implement through collaborative effort”

Increased access to parenting information, education, and support.

 

“Provide all families with young children easy access to Family Resource Centers.”

Parenting education to include lactation and dental health.”

Coordinated, affordable options for older school age youth/young adolescents.

N/A

N/A

Increased access and better information about subsidized services to all locations and populations.

 

“Communication tools to keep parents abreast of childcare availability and childcare strategies.”

Assist families in accessing all available sources of support including subsidies and tax benefits.”

Improve family access through better of transportation, and location of services

“A system of child and family centers to provide services in easily accessible locations.’

Child care “to address parent education and support”

“Establish Family Resource Centers and Parent Education programs accessible to parents living in at-risk neighborhoods.’

Improve services for family support, intervention, and respite (including CPS referrals and teen parents)

“One on one, in-home support services” for parents and children.”

“Early intervention strategies to address developmental needs of children and families”

“Early childhood development multidisciplinary team specific service to children and families.”

“Respite care /child care “to address family violence”

“Provide families that may be at-risk with in-home support services”

“Support the teen-age parents seeking childcare near the high schools. Recruit family childcare sites near the high schools”

 

Increased stability and quality of performance by child care staff and providers (both family child care and license exempt)

“Increase training, technical assistance and continuing education opportunities, for early childhood care and development providers”

“Increase the quality of exempt child care, child development training for exempt childcare providers and parents.”

“Access funds for a CARES Initiative [multiple strategies include] faculty and ECE Courses at Yuba College”


ATTACHMENT FOUR

Yuba Sutter Local Child Care Planning Council Membership

 

The Child Care Planning Council of Yuba and Sutter Counties has worked as a bi-county entity for the last nine years under the supervision of the Yuba and Sutter County Superintendents of Schools.  In 1991, California Assembly Bill 2141 created Child Care and Development Planning Councils in each county in California to insure that the planning of child care services was accomplished by a partnership of all groups concerned with safe, affordable, high-quality child care services to California’s families.

 

In 1997 the passage of AB 1542 California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs created legislative mandates for the Council.   In October, 1998 the Council was reconfigured and was officially designated a bi-county entity.  The California Department of Education, Child Development Division, funds the Council.  Activities of the Council are administered and coordinated by the Yuba and Sutter County Superintendent of Schools Offices.

 

Council members represent a cross section of Yuba and Sutter County businesses, parents, city and county governments, school districts, child care providers, and private industry.

 

 

Sutter County

Yuba County

 

Child Care Consumers

Kathy Tamez

 

Vacant

 

Esther Rivera

 

Vacant

 

 

 

Child Care Providers

Eva Teagarden

Yuba City Unified School District

 

JoAnne Aiello

Yuba Sutter Head Start

 

Linda Granger

Live Oak Child Care Center

Kathy Woods

Marysville Joint Unified School District

 

 

 

 

Public Agencies

Jackie Stanfill

Sutter –Yuba Mental Health

 

Sally Sokoloski

Yuba County Office of Education

 

Roberta Huffmaster

Sutter County Supt. of Schools

 

Barbara Miles

Yuba County Human Services Dept.

 

 

 

Community

Tresia Filby

Bi-County Family Day Care Association

Tricia Gurr

Twin Cities Assn. for the Education of Young Children

 

 
Sue Johnson

YMCA After School Program

 

 
Shelli Beach

Family Assistance Program

 

 

 

Discretionary

Yash Bhatia

CHDC Mahal Plaza Child Care

Dr. Anne Kress

Yuba College Early Childhood Education Department

 

 
Rebecca Horwath

Community Resource Services

 

Gaileen Bumgarner

Children’s Home Society of California

 

 


ATTACHMENT FIVE

 

Summary of Statutory Requirements

AB 1542 of 1997 (California Education Code 8499.5)

 

1.                   Elect a chair and select a staff.

 

2.                   Conduct an assessment of child care needs at least once every five years (12 specific needs variables specified).

 

3.                   Document information gathered during the needs assessment which shall include, but need not be limited to:  data on supply, demand, cost, and market rates for each category of child care in the county.

 

4.                   Encourage public input in the development of priorities.  Opportunities for public input shall include at least one public hearing during which members of the public can comment on the proposed priorities.

 

5.                   Prepare a comprehensive countywide child care plan designed to mobilize public and private re sources to address identified needs.

 

6.                   Conduct a periodic review of child care programs funded by the CDE (California Department of Education and CDSS (California Department of Social Services) to determine if identified priorities are being met.

 

7.                   Collaborate with subsidized and non-subsidized child care providers, county welfare and human service departments, job training programs, employers, integrated child and family service councils, parent organizations, and other interested parties to foster partnerships designed to meet local child care needs.

 

8.                   Design a system to consolidate local child care waiting lists.

 

9.                   Coordinate part-day programs including State Preschool and Head Start, with other child care to provide full-day child care.

 

10.               Submit the results of the needs assessment and the local priorities identified by the LPC (Local Planning Council) to the County Board of Supervisors and Superintendent of Schools for approval before submitting them to CDE.

 

11.               Review and comment on proposals submitted to the CDE that concern child care to be provided within the geographic area covered by the LPC.

 

12.               Identify one to two members of the LPC to serve as part of the CDE team that reviews and scores proposals for child care service funded through the CDE for geographic areas other than those covered by the LPC.

 

13.               Develop and implement a training plan to provide increased efficiency, productivity, and facilitation of LPC meetings.

 

14.               Provide consultation to CDE and CDSS regarding the development of a single application and intake form for all federal and state subsidized child care and development programs.

 

15.              No member of the LPC shall participate in a vote if they have a proprietary interest in the outcome of the matter.



[1] Throughout the plan, the terms “child care” and “early care and education” are used interchangeably to refer to services which provide a safe and healthy environment for children while their parents seek employment and training.  The latter term has recently gained popularity because education is a crucial component in all good quality care.

2 During the process, the plan had a number of working titles: Long Range Plan, Strategic Plan, and Five Year Plan being the most common.  The plan does have a five year horizon and is strategic in that it is based on analysis of resources, opportunities, and challenges, and identifies activities designed to achieve specified goals and objectives related to needs.